Art and Cancer Research

Research Abstract Highlights:

Art has magic power in chemotherapy patients

The arts in spiritual care.
  • CONCLUSION: The arts are now viewed as an integral component of holistic care for patients and families. By offering opportunities to engage in the arts and creative expression, persons with cancer can be enabled to mourn, grieve, celebrate life, be empowered to endure their situation, and find healing and meaning. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9392030

Testing the efficacy of a creative-arts intervention with family caregivers of patients with cancer.

Education of creative art therapy to cancer patients: evaluation and effects.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Creative art therapy benefits the quality of life of cancer patients. Follow-up studies should provide more insight into the change process during creative art therapy and its long-term effect on the quality of life for people with cancer. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18569242

Art therapy improves coping resources: A randomized, controlled study among women with breast cancer
  • RESULTS: There was an overall increase in coping resources among women with breast cancer after taking part in the art therapy intervention. Significant differences were seen between the study and control groups in the social domain on the second and third occasions. Significant differences were also observed in the total score on the second occasion. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16889324

Experiences of engagement in creative activity at a palliative care facility.
  • RESULTS: Engagement in creative activities was found to ease life in proximity to death for persons with advanced cancer and limited survival time. For the participants, creativity meant that some of the consequences of incurable cancer could be confronted and alternative potentials could be explored and acknowledged. This occurred in an ongoing process of creating alternative ways to deal with life. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17969827

Art therapy with cancer patients during chemotherapy sessions: An analysis of the patients’ perception of helpfulness
  • RESULTS: Out of the 54 patients, 3 found art therapy “not helpful” (“childish,” “just a chat,” “not interesting”). The other 51 patients described their art therapy experience as “helpful.” From patients’ statements, three main groups emerged: (1) art therapy was perceived as generally helpful (e.g., “relaxing,” “creative”; 37.3%), (2) art therapy was perceived as helpful because of the dyadic relationship (e.g., “talking about oneself and feeling listened to”; 33.3%), and (3) art therapy was perceived as helpful because of the triadic relationship, patient–image–art therapist (e.g., “expressing emotions and searching for meanings”; 29.4%). http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20163759

Other related articles:

The arts in spiritual care.
  • CONCLUSION: The arts are now viewed as an integral component of holistic care for patients and families. By offering opportunities to engage in the arts and creative expression, persons with cancer can be enabled to mourn, grieve, celebrate life, be empowered to endure their situation, and find healing and meaning. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9392030

Testing the efficacy of a creative-arts intervention with family caregivers of patients with cancer.

Education of creative art therapy to cancer patients: evaluation and effects.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Creative art therapy benefits the quality of life of cancer patients. Follow-up studies should provide more insight into the change process during creative art therapy and its long-term effect on the quality of life for people with cancer. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18569242

Art therapy improves coping resources: A randomized, controlled study among women with breast cancer
  • RESULTS: There was an overall increase in coping resources among women with breast cancer after taking part in the art therapy intervention. Significant differences were seen between the study and control groups in the social domain on the second and third occasions. Significant differences were also observed in the total score on the second occasion. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16889324

Experiences of engagement in creative activity at a palliative care facility.
  • RESULTS: Engagement in creative activities was found to ease life in proximity to death for persons with advanced cancer and limited survival time. For the participants, creativity meant that some of the consequences of incurable cancer could be confronted and alternative potentials could be explored and acknowledged. This occurred in an ongoing process of creating alternative ways to deal with life. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17969827

Art therapy with cancer patients during chemotherapy sessions: An analysis of the patients’ perception of helpfulness
  • RESULTS: Out of the 54 patients, 3 found art therapy “not helpful” (“childish,” “just a chat,” “not interesting”). The other 51 patients described their art therapy experience as “helpful.” From patients’ statements, three main groups emerged: (1) art therapy was perceived as generally helpful (e.g., “relaxing,” “creative”; 37.3%), (2) art therapy was perceived as helpful because of the dyadic relationship (e.g., “talking about oneself and feeling listened to”; 33.3%), and (3) art therapy was perceived as helpful because of the triadic relationship, patient–image–art therapist (e.g., “expressing emotions and searching for meanings”; 29.4%). http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20163759

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Global News- Sept 2, 2015